• What does it mean to be a quality Family Strengthening and Support Program?
• What common language can we use for working effectively with families?
• How can Programs use the Standards to advance Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion?

Based on the Principles of Family Support Practice and the Strengthening Families Framework and its research-based evidence-informed 5 Protective Factors, the nationally-adopted Standards of Quality for Family Strengthening & Support have created a common language across different kinds of Family Strengthening and Family Support programs such as Family Resource Centers, home visiting programs, and child development programs. They are used as a tool for planning, providing, and assessing quality practice by public departments, foundations, networks, community-based organizations, and families.

In 2020, the National Family Support Network conducted a review and revision process to update the Standards, engaging its Member Networks across the United States, parent leaders, and representatives of Family Strengthening and Support organizations in Canada, to provide input and feedback. The thoroughly revised Standards reflect an enhanced focus on diversity, equity, and inclusion, addressing community conditions that impact families’ healthy development, and relevance for both the U.S. and Canadian contexts.

The Standards address 5 critical areas of practice for any Program or individual working with families – Family Centeredness, Family Strengthening, Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, Community Strengthening, and Evaluation – with 15 Standards, each with Foundational and High Quality Indicators and implementation examples. The Standards and all their implementation tools are available for free download here.

More than 9,600 people have successfully completed the Standards Certification Training in 25 states and the District of Columbia. Many more have been introduced to them through conferences, webinars, and downloading them online.

PRESENTER

Andrew Russo, Co-Founder, Director, National Family Support Network.

• What does it mean to be a quality Family Strengthening and Support Program?
• What common language can we use for working effectively with families?
• How can Programs use the Standards to advance Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion?

Based on the Principles of Family Support Practice and the Strengthening Families Framework and its research-based evidence-informed 5 Protective Factors, the nationally-adopted Standards of Quality for Family Strengthening & Support have created a common language across different kinds of Family Strengthening and Family Support programs such as Family Resource Centers, home visiting programs, and child development programs. They are used as a tool for planning, providing, and assessing quality practice by public departments, foundations, networks, community-based organizations, and families.

In 2020, the National Family Support Network conducted a review and revision process to update the Standards, engaging its Member Networks across the United States, parent leaders, and representatives of Family Strengthening and Support organizations in Canada, to provide input and feedback. The thoroughly revised Standards reflect an enhanced focus on diversity, equity, and inclusion, addressing community conditions that impact families’ healthy development, and relevance for both the U.S. and Canadian contexts.

The Standards address 5 critical areas of practice for any Program or individual working with families – Family Centeredness, Family Strengthening, Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, Community Strengthening, and Evaluation – with 15 Standards, each with Foundational and High Quality Indicators and implementation examples. The Standards and all their implementation tools are available for free download here.

More than 9,600 people have successfully completed the Standards Certification Training in 25 states and the District of Columbia. Many more have been introduced to them through conferences, webinars, and downloading them online.

PRESENTER

Andrew Russo, Co-Founder, Director, National Family Support Network.

• What does it mean to be a quality Family Strengthening and Support Program?
• What common language can we use for working effectively with families?
• How can Programs use the Standards to advance Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion?

Based on the Principles of Family Support Practice and the Strengthening Families Framework and its research-based evidence-informed 5 Protective Factors, the nationally-adopted Standards of Quality for Family Strengthening & Support have created a common language across different kinds of Family Strengthening and Family Support programs such as Family Resource Centers, home visiting programs, and child development programs. They are used as a tool for planning, providing, and assessing quality practice by public departments, foundations, networks, community-based organizations, and families.

In 2020, the National Family Support Network conducted a review and revision process to update the Standards, engaging its Member Networks across the United States, parent leaders, and representatives of Family Strengthening and Support organizations in Canada, to provide input and feedback. The thoroughly revised Standards reflect an enhanced focus on diversity, equity, and inclusion, addressing community conditions that impact families’ healthy development, and relevance for both the U.S. and Canadian contexts.

The Standards address 5 critical areas of practice for any Program or individual working with families – Family Centeredness, Family Strengthening, Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, Community Strengthening, and Evaluation – with 15 Standards, each with Foundational and High Quality Indicators and implementation examples. The Standards and all their implementation tools are available for free download here.

More than 9,600 people have successfully completed the Standards Certification Training in 25 states and the District of Columbia. Many more have been introduced to them through conferences, webinars, and downloading them online.

PRESENTER

Andrew Russo, Co-Founder, Director, National Family Support Network.

• What does it mean to be a quality Family Strengthening and Support Program?
• What common language can we use for working effectively with families?
• How can Programs use the Standards to advance Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion?

Based on the Principles of Family Support Practice and the Strengthening Families Framework and its research-based evidence-informed 5 Protective Factors, the nationally-adopted Standards of Quality for Family Strengthening & Support have created a common language across different kinds of Family Strengthening and Family Support programs such as Family Resource Centers, home visiting programs, and child development programs. They are used as a tool for planning, providing, and assessing quality practice by public departments, foundations, networks, community-based organizations, and families.

In 2020, the National Family Support Network conducted a review and revision process to update the Standards, engaging its Member Networks across the United States, parent leaders, and representatives of Family Strengthening and Support organizations in Canada, to provide input and feedback. The thoroughly revised Standards reflect an enhanced focus on diversity, equity, and inclusion, addressing community conditions that impact families’ healthy development, and relevance for both the U.S. and Canadian contexts.

The Standards address 5 critical areas of practice for any Program or individual working with families – Family Centeredness, Family Strengthening, Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, Community Strengthening, and Evaluation – with 15 Standards, each with Foundational and High Quality Indicators and implementation examples. The Standards and all their implementation tools are available for free download here.

More than 9,600 people have successfully completed the Standards Certification Training in 25 states and the District of Columbia. Many more have been introduced to them through conferences, webinars, and downloading them online.

PRESENTER

Andrew Russo, Co-Founder, Director, National Family Support Network.

• What does it mean to be a quality Family Strengthening and Support Program?
• What common language can we use for working effectively with families?
• How can Programs use the Standards to advance Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion?

Based on the Principles of Family Support Practice and the Strengthening Families Framework and its research-based evidence-informed 5 Protective Factors, the nationally-adopted Standards of Quality for Family Strengthening & Support have created a common language across different kinds of Family Strengthening and Family Support programs such as Family Resource Centers, home visiting programs, and child development programs. They are used as a tool for planning, providing, and assessing quality practice by public departments, foundations, networks, community-based organizations, and families.

In 2020, the National Family Support Network conducted a review and revision process to update the Standards, engaging its Member Networks across the United States, parent leaders, and representatives of Family Strengthening and Support organizations in Canada, to provide input and feedback. The thoroughly revised Standards reflect an enhanced focus on diversity, equity, and inclusion, addressing community conditions that impact families’ healthy development, and relevance for both the U.S. and Canadian contexts.

The Standards address 5 critical areas of practice for any Program or individual working with families – Family Centeredness, Family Strengthening, Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, Community Strengthening, and Evaluation – with 15 Standards, each with Foundational and High Quality Indicators and implementation examples. The Standards and all their implementation tools are available for free download here.

More than 9,600 people have successfully completed the Standards Certification Training in 25 states and the District of Columbia. Many more have been introduced to them through conferences, webinars, and downloading them online.

PRESENTER

Andrew Russo, Co-Founder, Director, National Family Support Network.

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused a dramatic impact on the lives of children. In addition to reduced social service provision, access to health care, and school closures affecting over 1.4 billion children, parents and other caregivers have been forced to provide 24/7 care alongside increased stress, illness and financial insecurity. This has resulted in increased risks of child abuse, poverty, poor nutrition, and mental health problems among other negative outcomes.

The COVID-19 Playful Parenting Emergency Response brought together a multi-agency emergency COVID-19 response to provide parents with a set of open-source parenting resources by condensing evidence from multiple RCTs of parenting programmes in Africa, Asia and Europe to promote playful, nurturing caregiving and to prevent violence against children based on. These resources were developed with UNICEF, WHO, and other partners and diversified for multiple delivery formats and distribution networks, with rapid scale-up reaching an estimated 152 million people in 182 countries by April 2021.

This webinar will share how the RE-AIM framework was used to evaluate to examine the reach, effectiveness, adoption, implementation, and maintenance of the initiative. Quantitative and qualitative findings will be reported from global surveys, 11 country-level case studies, and interviews with implementers, parents, and adolescents. An interactive discussion will follow exploring the challenges of building a rigorous evidence-base whilst responding to a global crisis.

ABOUT THE PRESENTER

Dr. Jamie M. Lachman has over 20 years of experience developing, testing, and scaling up family and parenting programmes to reduce violence against children and improve child wellbeing in low- and middle-income countries.

He is a research officer at the University of Oxford Department of Social Policy and Intervention and a research fellow at the University of Glasgow MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit. He is also the founder of Clowns Without Borders South Africa and a co-founder of the Parenting for Lifelong Health initiative. The programmes and resources that Jamie has co-developed have reached over 134 million beneficiaries in 182 countries.

He is also a storyteller, banjo-player, songwriter, facilitator, and clown. Dedicated to promoting our human capacity for peace and laughter, Jamie strives to live each day fully with compassion and amazement.

Whether it is at home, in communities, or at schools, what evidence-based strategies are available to promote success for children? And what are the barriers that impede uptake of these programs and limit access to opportunities?

This public information-gathering session is being held by the Committee on Exploring the Opportunity Gap for Young Children From Birth to Age Eight. This session will discuss evidence-based, effective strategies for improving conditions and promoting success for children. Speakers will discuss how the opportunity gap is measured and barriers to accessing opportunities for young children. These presentations will help inform the committee’s final report.

To deepen our strategic thinking about implementing and expanding effective programs serving children and families, we hope you will join us for a discussion about the value, impact, and application of parent partner programs. Research has shown the effectiveness and positive outcomes for families impacted by the child welfare system when working with Parent Partners. This conversation will highlight those findings, explore various Parent Partner programs, and describe key components of these programs, which leverage meaningful engagement through lived experience to support families in navigating systems. This introductory presentation and discussion will help elevate what we know about parent partner programs and encourage increased exploration and implementation of these critical programs.

Presenters include:
• Ebony Chambers, Stanford Sierra Youth & Families, Chief Family & Youth Partnership Officer
• Julie Farber, NYC Administration for Children’s Services, Division of Family Permanency, Deputy Commissioner
• Alise Morrissey, Parent for Parent, Director of Family Impact
• Sara Persons, Children & Families of Iowa, Statewide Parent Partner Director
• David Sanders, Casey Family Programs, Systems Improvement Executive Vice President
• Nicole Dobbins, Casey Family Programs, National Partnerships
• Whitney Rostad, Casey Family Programs, Research Services
• Kamalii Yeh Garcia, Casey Family Programs, Knowledge Management.

• What does it mean to be a quality Family Strengthening and Support Program?
• What common language can we use for working effectively with families?
• How can Programs use the Standards to advance Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion?

Based on the Principles of Family Support Practice and the Strengthening Families Framework and its research-based evidence-informed 5 Protective Factors, the nationally-adopted Standards of Quality for Family Strengthening & Support have created a common language across different kinds of Family Strengthening and Family Support programs such as Family Resource Centers, home visiting programs, and child development programs. They are used as a tool for planning, providing, and assessing quality practice by public departments, foundations, networks, community-based organizations, and families.

In 2020, the National Family Support Network conducted a review and revision process to update the Standards, engaging its Member Networks across the United States, parent leaders, and representatives of Family Strengthening and Support organizations in Canada, to provide input and feedback. The thoroughly revised Standards reflect an enhanced focus on diversity, equity, and inclusion, addressing community conditions that impact families’ healthy development, and relevance for both the U.S. and Canadian contexts.

The Standards address 5 critical areas of practice for any Program or individual working with families – Family Centeredness, Family Strengthening, Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, Community Strengthening, and Evaluation – with 15 Standards, each with Foundational and High Quality Indicators and implementation examples. The Standards and all their implementation tools are available for free download here.

More than 9,600 people have successfully completed the Standards Certification Training in 25 states and the District of Columbia. Many more have been introduced to them through conferences, webinars, and downloading them online.

PRESENTER

Andrew Russo, Co-Founder, Director, National Family Support Network.